Sexual assault can happen to anyone, anywhere. We attempt to mitigate this unsettling fact by looking for easy answers. Unfortunately, the victim often becomes the subject of our scrutiny and ultimately, the one we blame for the assault. Victim-blaming retraumatizes survivors of sexual violence, compounding their feelings of fear, isolation and hopelessness.

Although perpetrators of sexual violence can target anyone, individuals from marginalized communities are at increased risk. Vulnerable populations include: women, people of color, youth, elders, the poor, the homeless, people with substance dependencies, people who identify as LGBTQ, people with physical disabilities, and people with mental illness. Networks of oppression create circumstances that leave marginalized individuals vulnerable to sexual predation, at the same time perpetuating prejudices that work to normalize their victimization.

The #MeToo Movement

The MeToo movement has helped to raise awareness about the epidemic of sexual violence in the United States. By tweeting #MeToo, survivors have called out not only individual perpetrators, but the industries that explicitly or implicitly support sexual violence. Consumers are placing increasing pressure on businesses to implement sexual assault awareness and response strategies. Rideshare companies such as Uber and Lyft are facing lawsuits for negligence that may have contributed to sexual assaults perpetrated by their drivers.

Sexual Assault Survivors

Survivors of sexual assault deserve to obtain the resources they need to heal from sexual assault.  Our attorneys use the civil justice system to hold perpetrators of sexual violence and the systems that support them accountable for their violations. To learn more, please contact us today for a free consultation.

According to the National Sexual Violence Resource Center

63%

63% of Sexual Assaults Go Unreported

91%

91% of Sexual Assault Victims Are Women

9%

9% of Sexual Assault Victims Are Men

80%

80% of Victims Knew The Perpetrator